More Libre.fm news — server move, new design, kittens.

This month sees a massive update to Libre.fm’s infrastructure thanks to our good friends at Bytemark.

Bytemark have generously donated us a ton of resources for Libre.fm including a new database server with super fast solid state disks, and a pair of load balanced high speed web servers for the site.

What this means for everyone else is that things are about to get a lot faster.

This does however mean that there will be some downtime for the site, during which time we won’t be accepting scrobbles. If your client is any good, it’ll cache those scrobbles for you, and when we come back online, your listening history will be sent over. Traditionally, coming back online after a little bit of downtime means we get a TON of scrobbles submitted to us, which slows the site down a bunch, so it’ll be interesting to see how well it works on the new setup.

Huge thanks to Matthew, Peter and Tim over at Bytemark for making this happen and their continued support.

In addition, we hope to launch the new design of the site at the same time.

Libre.fm’s own Matt Lee and Rob Myers will be on-hand during the migration to answer any of your questions — grab us on Twitter or GNU social @librefm (we’re on Quitter.se if you use GNU social)

Oh, and we have a donations page where we accept all kinds of donations and high-fives and even Bitcoin (which we don’t know how to really use yet, so suggestions are welcome on that too)

Kittens? Here’s a GIF of a cat eating a watermelon.

giphy

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Support the Free Software Foundation when buying stuff on Amazon

So, this is pretty fantastic, especially if like me you buy a ton of stuff from Amazon Prime.

  1. Go to smile.amazon.com and sign in with your Amazon account.
  2. Search for “Free Software Foundation” in the list of charities, and pick the one in Boston, MA.
  3. Buy stuff on Amazon.

0.5% of all your purchases go to the FSF.

Screenshot from 2013-12-19 16:08:39

A great way to support the FSF and Libre.fm — the FSF is the host organization for GNU, and Libre.fm runs on the GNU FM we wrote, which is part of GNU. Phew.

PS. If you’re not following @librefm on GNU social (our other project) or @librefm on Twitter, you should do so.

PPS. Yes, we know Amazon has a lot of issues like Kindle DRM and doesn’t treat small publishers (like the FSF’s GNU Press) very well, but it’s a great place to buy large bags of candy, jars of Red Vines (Twizzlers suck!) and music by some of the artists on Libre.fm, which is another way you can support artists.

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Libre.fm news for September 2013

This weekend, there’s a hackathon for the GNU FM
software that powers Libre.fm. If you’re interested in
improving the site, please join us on IRC or in person
at MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

We’ll be focusing on the new look and feel for the site
this weekend, but now is a good time to get involved if
you have any PHP skills too, as we have plenty of other
interesting things to work on as well.

Five years ago, I had the pleasure to work with the
comedian and author Stephen Fry on a short film about
GNU, which you can watch at:

I’ll be at the event in Cambridge, so stop by and say
hello.

If you can join us in person, check out
or if you’re attending virtually,
we’ll be in #libre.fm on Freenode. Join us using a
standard IRC client (such as XChat) or via your web
browser.

# GNU social news

Our sister project, GNU social (previously known as
StatusNet) will also be in attendance this weekend, and
I’ll be running hackathons for both projects from a
single room.

At GNU 30th, we’ll be launching http://g.nu/ — a GNU
social site for the GNU Project, as well as a couple
other GNU social sites, including one open to the public.

As we roll it out slowly, more details and your
exclusive invite code will be sent to you via email.

# And in other news:

Bytemark Hosting in the UK has stepped up as a new host for Libre.fm and we’ll be moving the site over to their new infrastructure in the coming weeks, including putting our mammoth database onto a series of very fast solid-state drives, which will make things faster for everyone. Thanks to Tim and Matthew at Bytemark for making everything awesome.

Donations for Libre.fm are welcome in a variety of ways,

incluing Flattr and Bitcoins, as well as PayPal:

http://libre.fm/donate.html

You can follow me on Twitter (and soon GNU social) @mattl

Libre.fm and GNU social are also on Twitter: @librefm @gnusocial

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Use Libre.fm and GNU FM and help defeat surveillance

Right now, we’re working on a brand new look and feel for all GNU FM sites, based on the latest release of Bootstrap (we promise it’ll be less purple) and I thought I’d take a few minutes to share some ideas I’ve had recently on the subject of privacy and surveillance.

As you hopefully know if you use Libre.fm, we do not log your personally identifiable information, such as your IP address, screen resolution, etc. Almost every other website does this in some way, either with a program such as Google Analytics, or with their server logs.

Here’s exactly what we store on the site right now:

libre.fm:80 127.0.0.1 - - [25/Aug/2013:06:26:02 -0700] "GET /themes/librefm/img/player/seek-backward.png HTTP/1.1" 304 188 "-" "Mozilla/5.0 (compatible; YandexImages/3.0; +http://yandex.com/bots)"

libre.fm:80 127.0.0.1 - - [25/Aug/2013:06:25:57 -0700] "GET /2.0/?method=track.gettoptags&artist=Tryad&track=Lovely&format=json HTTP/1.1" 200 3444 "http://libre.fm/user/Trim/station" "Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:23.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/23.0 Iceweasel/23.0.1"

In these results, we can see that a search engine indexed one of our images, and that another user tried to find the top tracks by Tryad, but we don’t know which user is doing this, or where they are located.

This is not true of sites like Last.fm, and especially not true of Facebook. Facebook apps work with sites such as
Rdio, Spotify and others to show up to the minute live listening information from other sites, right in the users’ Facebook action stream.

For maximum privacy, we recommend installing your own GNU FM server. We have already demonstrated limited federation abilities at FOSDEM last year, and have recently green lit our work on the GNU social project which will give us a strong, federated social presence, and technology we can piggy back onto.

With the 30th anniversary of the GNU project coming, now is an important time for all GNU projects to work together on providing a real alternative to sites that users cannot control.

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72 million songs later…

On April 1st, 2009 I outlined my ideas for a new kind of music

service in an image I put together with Inkscape.

Libre.fm is a project to help keep track of what music you like and

share that, with your friends…

…discover new music, and meet new people who share your taste in
music.

Sounds familar, but wait…

* Complete public source code licensed under the GNU AGPL
* You own your data…
* Use our service, or run your own
* Get started and hacking today

With links to source code (then in SVN) and a mailing list and an
ideas wiki.

Four years later, we have over 100,000 users, over 72 million tracks
have been recorded and we’re still going. In many ways, Libre.fm is
the most successful thing I’ve ever done.

It started when I offered to give a talk at the LibrePlanet 2009
conference about network services, one idea I had been playing with
for a little while was the idea of some free alternative to Last.fm,
and had been poking around on my own computer, trying to capture my
scrobbles in a text file.

The whole story of the project should be told some day, perhaps in the
inevitable manual that we should go ahead and make.

For now, I would like to thank the amazing people who’ve been on this
journey with me so far — especially Mike Sheldon (Elleo) who
increasingly writes lot of the code himself, but also Clint Adams
(Clint) and Jørgen Bøhnsdalen (jurg) for their work over the
years. Thanks to our upcoming new star developer, Jonas Haraldsson
(kabniel) who started out fixing all the broken stuff on our wiki.

Thanks to the huge list of people who at some point contributed too:

Justin Baugh (baughj), Carlos Perilla (deepspawn), Donald R Robertson
III (donald), Evan Hanson (evhan), Nicolas Reynolds (fauno), Corey
Farwell (frewsxcv), Bernd Gruber (grubernd), Marius Orcsik (habarnam),
David Mignot (idflood), Jarkko Piiroinen (jarkko), John Sullivan
(johnsu01), Joshua Gay (josh), Mikael Nordfeldth (mmn), Nikola Plejic
(nikolaplejic), Daniel Watkins (odd_bloke), Toby Inkster (tobyink) and
Tony Biondo (tonyb486).

And thanks to my wife, Robin, to Rob Myers and to Ward Vandewege for
all their help keeping things ticking along nicely all this time.

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News for March 2011

Translations

At the bottom of the main site (alpha.libre.fm) you’ll now see a small drop-down box that allows you to select the language you’d like to view Libre.fm in. Thanks to the sterling work of a whole host of dedicated translators we now have pretty complete translations for Esperanto, Finnish, French, Galician, German, Slovenian, Spanish and Welsh. If you’d like to help translate Libre.fm to support even more languages then simply visit our translations page, sign up for an account and get stuck in.

Google Summer of Code

This year we’re taking part in the Google Summer of Code under the umbrella of the GNU project. If you’re currently a university student and are interested in spending your summer working on GNU FM (the software behind Libre.fm) and getting paid to do so, then drop by the #libre.fm IRC channel on irc.freenode.net and have a chat with us about how to apply. There’s only a few days left until the application deadline on the 8th of April, so don’t delay. Further details…

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Google Summer of Code 2011

This year GNU FM and Libre.fm are proud to be taking part in the Google Summer of Code under the GNU banner. Interested students can find a list of our suggested ideas here:

Naturally we’re also interested in hearing your own ideas as well. 
To increase chances of acceptance we strongly recommended that students pop on to our IRC channel (#libre.fm on irc.freenode.net) and discuss their planned projects with us prior to submitting applications. In addition to this providing some patches for existing bugs/feature improvements can help us to judge ability levels more accurately (as well as helping you to get to grips with our code-base and community a little in advance).
After 19:00 UTC today (28th March) it should be possible to start working on your application at:
The deadline for applications is 12:00 UTC on the 8th of April.

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